Author Interview with Z Egloff

9 03 2013

Hello readers!

This week we interviewed Z Egloff about her novels: Verge and Leap. Her debut novel, Verge, was awarded the Bywater Prize for Fiction in May of 2008. Her newest novel, Leap. will be published March 15th by Bywater Books.

What makes a good story?

Ultimately, I can only speak for what works for me as a reader. Bottom line, I like a story that draws me in. If I learn something in the process – either about myself or the world in general – that’s a bonus.

What do you like to do when you are not writing?

My three big passions in life are writing, music and speaking. I do a fair amount of all three. I play piano with a choir and also with my wife, Melissa, who is a singer/songwriter. I give regular talks about spiritual practice at the Center for Spiritual Living in Santa Rosa. My three passions feed each other, keeping everything interesting.

What inspired you to start writing?

I was first inspired to write by television! The TV show “ER” had a storyline with a couple of lesbian characters back in 2000. I was drawn into the fanfic universe online, and soon progressed to original fiction.

Claire Minn is a loveable but frustrating character to read about; what was she like to write?

It’s funny, because I know a lot of people have been frustrated by Claire, but I never was. Perhaps it’s like an actor who agrees to play a less-than-perfect character. She just led me into her world and I recorded what happened. In spite of her numerous flaws, I always had great affection for Claire, which helped me to stick with her and her story.

Were you worried about a religious backlash from Catholic groups because Sister Hilary is a lesbian?

I was a little worried about backlash. But more than that, I was worried about being true to the character of a modern-day woman religious. I did lots of research on the topic, including interviewing former nuns who had later come out as lesbian.

Many characters in Verge and Leap are recovering from various types of addictions or destructive behaviors. Are these situations and characters based off of real people and events?

The characters in my stories are only vaguely based on real people. In general, they are an amalgamation of people I’ve known and places I’ve been in my own life. I know that some writers take people in their lives and turn them into fiction, but that’s not the case for me. It’s a much more indirect process.

What sort of research about filmmaking did you have to do to write Verge?

I was a film minor in college, so I had that as a base. I did lots of reading about film and video for Verge, as things had changed a lot since I was in college. I also talked with people who knew a lot about video in order to understand some of the mechanics. I’m still in love with film and movies, so that was one reason it was easy to research and write about the topic.

What are your favorite films?

Oh, there are so many. Two very important films for me are “Cousin Cousine” and Truffaut’s “Small Change.” I saw these two movies as a teenager during a period when I had been depressed for months. The combination of these two films brought me out of my depression. They’re both French, which is interesting, because my depression had been brought about by studying French existentialists. I guess I needed a different perspective.

Was writing and publishing your second novel, Leap, easier than writing and publishing Verge?

Leap was the first novel I wrote, so it was actually harder to write than Verge. After finishing an early draft of Leap, I put it aside. Verge  was the first book I sent out to agents and publishers. When Bywater picked up Verge, I sent them Leap and they decided to publish it as well. When I was writing Leap, I was still on a huge learning curve. It went through countless drafts, with long periods between some of them. There were several points along the way when I just figured that Leap would stay on the shelf. I was wrong.

Leap explores falling in and out of love. Are any of these experiences based on your life?

Like the previous question, the experiences of my characters only hint at things I’ve experienced. The commonality is the emotions evoked by what happens. I’ve had my heart broken, and it happened when I was young. More than once. So in that sense, there’s a link there.

What advice do you wish you could give Rowan as she starts to understand her sexuality?

I would tell her that time is amazing. Things that are so hard in one period of your life can completely turn around and become easy. Challenges can become strengths. And understanding and celebrating your sexuality is one of those strengths.

Finding a place within your family and your community are strong themes in your books. Would you like to expand on those themes?

Honestly, I’m not sure. Each book seems to emerge on its own, without me deliberately deciding what it’s going to be about. I suspect that the themes of family and community will always be there somewhere, though.

Which character from your novels would you like to go to dinner with and why?

Great question! Probably Claire. She’s such a hot mess, I’d love to see what she’s like in person.

Tell us about your upcoming projects.

I’ve got several projects in the works. There’s a novel about a woman whose love interest disappears into another dimension. And then there’s a book about a woman who falls in love with her spiritual teacher. And then another one that’s just starting to form.

Where can we buy your books?

Books are available through Bywater’s website at http://www.bywaterbooks.com/  Copies are also available through amazon.com and many bookstores. If your bookstore doesn’t have it, they can order a copy through Bywater.

If you want to learn more about Z Egloff visit her website:  zegloff.com; follow her on twitter https://twitter.com/ZEgloff; or go to her Facebook Page:  https://www.facebook.com/ZEgloff

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Author Interview: Jilll Malone

25 01 2013

Hello, Readers!

This week we have interview Jill Malone about her upcoming title Giraffe People which will be out in May, 2013 by Bywater Books. It is a fantastic read about adolescence, rock and roll, love and army life.

1.  What makes a good story?

I prefer character-driven stories with tension and subtlety. Jack Gilbert called it the engine. Is the engine big enough for this story? What kind of engine does this story have? I’m a sucker for grace – for stories that redeem the character(s) in some way. I don’t mean spiritually, but I am talking about soul. Why is this story told with these characters? The story needs to feel surprising, and inevitable. I have to want things with them, and for them. I have to buy in to their conflict in some way. It’s not important to me to like the characters; I’d rather they be recognizable than likeable. I read to be compelled.

2. What inspired you to become a writer?

I’ve been writing stories since I remember holding a pencil. I grew up with Bible stories and Shakespeare. My mother read Jane Austen, and bought me piles of mythology stories – Greek, Roman, South Pacific, Norse. My parents read me an odd mix of Southern American writers and English writers, and when I listened to my father’s sermons, I realized they were stories, too. In elementary school I wrote plays for all my friends, and printed newspaper sheets to entertain them. It was more fun to invent news than report actual happenings.

3. How did you come up with the title Giraffe People?

For a while, I wasn’t sure what to call it, but Cole describes her family as Giraffe People early in the manuscript, and it seemed so perfect. They are these strange lumbering creatures — familial and foreign, wandering and tribal. And it allowed for the beautiful awkwardness of Cole herself.

4.  How much of the military life presented in Giraffe People is based off of personal experience?

My father was an Army chaplain for twenty years – he retired when I graduated from high school. The military details are true to my experience as a military brat. I combined the bases at Fort Monmouth and Oahu to allow for richer details and to help camouflage real people. I read this amazing story, Dog Heaven, by Stephanie Vaughn, and it seemed to me that the experience of military dependents was this trove that had rarely been explored.

5. Does Cole’s band, Doggy Life, survive her move to Hawaii?

Probably not, but I imagine something else will find her. The islands are filled with alluring music, and she has learned that new sounds are out there and it’s important to seek them.

6.  Where did the idea for the word lists come from? 

My family did sponsor cadets when I was in school at Fort Monmouth, and the cadets had these awful vocabulary lists they’d bring over to the house. It seemed like the ideal way to allow for a private conversation between Cole and Meghan as well as Cole and the reader. And you get to see how Cole’s mind works in ways that the narrative doesn’t necessarily allow.

7.  Sex and the loss of innocence is a recurring theme in Giraffe People– is there a message you want the reader to grasp about sex?

Sex is a recurring theme in everything I write. I think I’m trying to take sex and shame apart — to separate them so that I can see each clearly. Initially, for Cole, sex seems almost an empirical experience, but that changes as the story progresses, and that’s the part I love. I love that sex unfurls. That it seems, at first, to be one shape, but is, in fact, many.

8. Music is such an important influence in Cole’s life- what is your ultimate play list?

Oh! I love this question. I’ve just been listening to a lot of Jazz because Dave Brubeck died, and so there’d be horns and piano and drums. Duets with Louis Armstrong and Ella Fitzgerald. There’d be Ramones, and CCR, and Fiona Apple. There’d be Spanish guitar, and Florence and the Machine. The National, Gillian Welch, Arcade Fire, Metric, Santigold, Jack White, Loretta Lynn. There’d be old country and punk and club-kid music from the 80s and Bikini Kill and Warpaint and djembe and all sorts of weird stuff.  If we could dance to it, we’d play it.

9.  Which of your characters would you like to have dinner with and why?

I’d like to have dinner with Jane from Red Audrey and the Roping, and Cole from Giraffe People. I feel like those two would have a lot to talk about and I could just sit and observe them. We’d eat Island food and watch the tide and drink beer from green bottles.

10.  When will Giraffe People be published?

Giraffe People is due out in May, 2013.

11.  Can you tell the readers about your other books?

Red Audrey and the Roping is a story about self. About self-injury and self-forgiveness.

A Field Guide to Deception is a story about family. About the kind of honesty it takes to live in a family and function.

In different ways, I think my first two novels are love stories. It just takes time to get there. Sometimes lifetimes.

12.  Where can my readers buy your books?

My books are available through my publisher’s site: www.bywaterbooks.com, on Amazon.com and at your local, independent retailer. They’re available in print and e-books.

Check out Jill Malone and her awesome book, Giraffe People at the following links:

http://www.jillmalone.com

http://www.facebook.com/jillamymalone

http://www.twitter.com/jill_malone





Ghostwriting: An Overview

3 01 2013

ghostwriter is a writer who writes books, articles, stories, reports, or other texts that are officially credited to another person. Celebrities, executives, and political leaders often hire ghostwriters to draft or edit autobiographies, magazine articles, or other written material. In music, ghostwriters are often used for writing songs and lyrics for popular music genres.

Ghostwriters may have varying degrees of involvement in the production of a finished work. While some ghostwriters are hired to edit and clean up a rough draft, others are hired to do most of the writing based on an outline provided by the credited author. For some projects, ghostwriters will do a substantial amount of research, as in the case of a ghostwriter who is hired to write an autobiography for a well-known person. Ghostwriters are also hired to write fiction in the style of an existing author, often as a way of increasing the number of books that can be published by a popular author (e.g., Tom Clancy, James Patterson). Ghostwriters will often spend a period from several months to a full year researching, writing, and editing nonfiction works for a client, and they are paid either per page, with a flat fee, or a percentage of the royalties of the sales, or some combination thereof. The ghostwriter is sometimes acknowledged by the author or publisher for his or her writing services.

A consultant or career-switcher may pay a ghostwriter to write a book on a topic in their professional area, to establish or enhance their credibility as an ‘expert’ in their field. Public officials andpoliticians employ ‘correspondence officers’ to respond to the large volume of correspondence. A number of papal encyclicals have been written by ghostwriters. With medical ghostwriting, pharmaceutical companies pay both professional writers to produce papers and then pay other scientists or physicians to attach their names to these papers before they are published in medical or scientific journals. In the 2000s (decade), a new type of ghostwriting developed as blogs became popular: the blog ghostwriter. Companies or organizations hoping to generate interest in their blog site sometimes hire ghostwriters to post comments to their blog, while posing as different people and using pseudonyms. Some university and college students hire ghostwriters from essay mills to write entrance essays, term papers, theses, and dissertations.

Ghostwriting (or simply “ghosting”) also occurs in other creative fields. Composers have long hired ghostwriters to help them to write musical pieces and songs; Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart is an example of a well-known composer who was paid to ghostwrite music for wealthy patrons. Ghosting also occurs in popular music. A pop music ghostwriter writes lyrics and a melody in the style of the credited musician. In hip hop music, the increasing use of ghostwriters by high-profile hip-hop stars[who?] has led to controversy. In the visual arts, it is not uncommon in either fine art or commercial art such as comics for a number of assistants to do work on a piece that is credited to a single artist.

The division of work between the ghostwriter and the credited author varies a great deal. In some cases, the ghostwriter is hired to edit a rough draft of a mostly completed manuscript. In this case, the outline, ideas and much of the language in the finished book or article are those of the credited author. In other cases, a ghostwriter handles most of the writing, using concepts and stories provided by the credited author. In this case, a ghostwriter will do extensive research on the credited author or their subject area of expertise. It is rare for a ghostwriter to prepare a book or article with no input from the credited author; at a minimum, the credited author usually jots down a basic framework of ideas at the outset or provides comments on the ghostwriter’s final draft.

For an autobiography, a ghostwriter will interview the credited author, their colleagues, and family members, and find interviews, articles, and video footage about the credited author or their work. For other types of nonfiction books or articles, a ghostwriter will interview the credited author and review previous speeches, articles, and interviews with the credited author, to assimilate his or her arguments and points of view.

Ghostwriters are hired for numerous reasons. In many cases, celebrities or public figures do not have the time, discipline, or writing skills to write and research a several-hundred page autobiography or “how-to” book. Even if a celebrity or public figure has the writing skills to pen a short article, they may not know how to structure and edit a several-hundred page book so that it is captivating and well-paced. In other cases, publishers use ghostwriters to increase the number of books that can be published each year under the name of well-known, highly marketable authors. Usually, there is a confidentiality clause in the contract between the ghostwriter and the credited author that obligates the former to remain anonymous.

The ghostwriter for Hillary Clinton’s memoirs received a $500,000 fee for collaborating with her.

Ghostwriters will often spend from several months to a full year researching, writing, and editing nonfiction works for a client, and they are paid either per page, with a flat fee, or a percentage of the royalties of the sales, or some combination thereof. Some ghostwriters charge for articles “$4 per word and more depending on the complexity” of the article.Literary agent Madeleine Morel states that the average ghostwriter’s advance for work for major publishers is “between $30,000 and $100,000”. In 2001, the New York Times stated that the fee that the ghostwriter for Hillary Clinton’s memoirs will receive is probably about $500,000″ of her book’s $8 million advance, which “is near the top of flat fees paid to collaborators.”

According to Ghostwriters Ink, a professional ghostwriting service, this flat fee is usually closer to an average of $12,000 to $28,000 per book. By hiring the ghostwriter for this negotiated price, the clients ultimately keep all advances and post-publishing royalties and profits for themselves.

However, certain other websites suggest that this could be considered on the low side and that $16,000 to $50,000 is a more precise range. Manhattan Literary, a ghost writing service specializing in book writing, concurs with these higher prices and also gives a specific reason for the wide range: that these fees per book are determined in part by whether or not the client provides a draft of the text. If so, a 250 page book would start at $18,000. With no draft or no previous attempt at writing the text (extensive sketches), $28,000 is a more likely starting price.

Similarly, there are some ghostwriting services that charge per page for the entire project so the prospective client can know the final cost upfront. This option can be helpful for clients that have a specific page count to achieve for their book.

Some ghostwriters charge 40-50c per word (i.e. a 200 page book would cost $24,000 to $30,000). In Canada, The Writers’ Union has established a minimum fee schedule for ghostwriting. The total minimum fee for a 200-300 page book is $40,000, paid at various stages of the drafting of the book. Research fees are an extra charge on top of this minimum fee.In Germany the average fee for a confidential ghostwriting service is about $100.00 per page.

There is a recent trend of outsourcing ghostwriting jobs to offshore locations like India and the Philippines, to save up to 80%. Outsourced ghostwriters whose quality levels vary widely, complete 200-page books for fees ranging between $3000 and $5000, or $12–$18 per page. This sharp price cut in ghostwriters’ fees is encouraging more outsourcing. However, the premium typically paid for such outsourcing is that a book that is not likely to be published. Also, reasonable questions emerge. At what very low price level does the responsibility the writer feels to the client diminish? What recourse does a client have with a problem in India or abroad? The bottom line is it comes down to the individual being hired.

Sometimes the ghostwriter will receive partial credit on a book, signified by the phrase “with…” or “as told to…” on the cover. Credit for the ghostwriter may also be provided as a “thanks” in a forewordor introduction. For nonfiction books, the ghostwriter may be credited as a “contributor” or a “research assistant”. In other cases, the ghostwriter receives no official credit for writing a book or article; in cases where the credited author or the publisher or both wish to conceal the ghostwriter’s role, the ghostwriter may be asked to sign a nondisclosure contract that forbids him or her from revealing his or her ghostwriting role.

Nonfiction

Ghostwriters are widely used by celebrities and public figures who wish to publish their autobiographies or memoirs. The degree of involvement of the ghostwriter in nonfiction writing projects ranges from minor to substantial. Various sources explain the role of the ghostwriter and how competent writers can get this kind of work. In some cases, a ghostwriter may be called in just to clean up, edit, and polish a rough draft of an autobiography or a “how-to” book. In other cases, the ghostwriter will write an entire book or article based on information, stories, notes, and an outline, interview sessions with the celebrity or public figure. The credited author also indicates to the ghostwriter what type of style, tone, or “voice” they want in the book.

In some cases, such as with some “how-to” books, diet guides, or cookbooks, a book will be entirely written by a ghostwriter, and the celebrity (e.g., a well-known musician or sports star) will be credited as author. Publishing companies use this strategy to increase the marketability of a book by associating it with a celebrity or well-known figure. In several countries before elections, candidates commission ghostwriters to produce autobiographies for them so as to gain visibility and exposure. Two of John F. Kennedy‘s books are almost entirely credited to ghostwriters. Former President Ronald Reagan also released a ghostwritten autobiography.

A consultant or career-switcher may pay to have a book ghostwritten on a topic in their professional area, to establish or enhance their credibility as an ‘expert’ in their field. For example, a successful salesperson hoping to become a motivational speaker on selling may pay a ghostwriter to write a book on sales techniques. Often this type of book is published by a self-publishing press (or “vanity press“), which means that the author is paying to have the book published. This type of book is typically given away to prospective clients as a promotional tool, rather than being sold in bookstores.

Fiction

Ghostwriters are employed by fiction publishers for several reasons. In some cases, publishers use ghostwriters to increase the number of books that can be published each year by a well-known, highly marketable author. Ghostwriters are mostly used to pen fiction works for well-known, “name” authors in genres such as detective fiction, mysteries, and teen fiction.

Additionally, publishers use ghostwriters to write new books for established series where the ‘author’ is a pseudonym. For example, the purported author of the Nancy Drew mystery series, “Carolyn Keene“, is actually a pseudonym for a series of ghostwriters who write books in the same style using a template of basic information about the book’s characters and their fictional universe (names, dates, speech patterns), and about the tone and style that are expected in the book. (For more information, see the articles on pseudonyms or pen names.) In addition, ghostwriters are often given copies of several of the previous books in the series to help them match the style.

The known web publicist Keith Acton rose to underground notoriety and disdain when it was discovered he had paid a ghostwriter to write most of his work. Moreover, the estate of romance novelist V. C. Andrews hired a ghostwriter to continue writing novels after her death, under her name and in a similar style to her original works. Many of action writer Tom Clancy‘s books from the 2000s (decade) bear the names of two people on their covers, with Clancy’s name in larger print and the other author’s name in smaller print. Various books bearing Clancy’s name were written by different authors under the same pseudonym. The first two books in the Tom Clancy’s Splinter Cell franchise were written by Raymond Benson under the pseudonym David Michaels.

Sometimes famous authors will ghostwrite for other celebrities as well, such as when H. P. Lovecraft ghostwrote science fiction stories for Harry Houdini in science fiction magazines in the 1920s

Political
However, if the response is being sent to a high-ranking official or member of society, a draft of the letter may be given to the head of state or their top advisers for approval—particularly if the letter deals with a politically sensitive issue. This is sometimes also done for “Dear Colleague” letters, which are intended as policy papers rather than personal correspondence. Public officials at lower levels, such as middle managers and department heads will often review, request changes in, and hand sign all outgoing correspondence, even though the initial drafts are composed by a correspondence officer or policy analyst.Public officials and politicians employ ‘correspondence officers’ to respond to the large volume of correspondence that they receive. The degree of involvement of the public official in the drafting of response letters varies, depending on the nature of the letter, its contents, the importance of the official and the sender, and personal preference. At the highest level, public officials such as heads of state and regional governors typically have their officials approve the content of routine correspondence and autopen their signature with a signature machine.

Since members of the public are widely aware that politicians are not themselves writing routine response letters, it can be argued that these correspondence officers are not ghostwriters in the strictest sense of the term. Public officials may also have a speechwriter, who writes public remarks and speeches, or both jobs may be done by a single person.

Religious

A number of papal encyclicals have been written by ghostwriters. Pascendi, for instance, was written by Joseph Lemius (1860–1923), the procurator in Rome of the Oblates of Mary Immaculate. In June 1938, Pious XI summoned American Jesuit John La Farge, who began to prepare a draft of Humani Generis Unitas, which LaFarge and two other Jesuits—Gustav Gundlach and Gustave Desbuquois on in Paris; the draft was approximately 100 pages long. Another Jesuit translated the draft encyclical into Latin, presenting it to Wlodimir Ledóchowski, then the General of the Society of Jesus who had chosen Gundlach and Desbuquois for the project. The draft encyclical was delivered to the Vatican in September 1938. Sebastian Tromp, a Dutch Jesuit, a solid Thomist theologian and close to Pope Pious XII, is considered to be the main ghostwriter of Mystici Corporis.

Academic

Some university and college students hire ghostwriters from essay mills to write entrance essays, term papers, and theses and dissertations. In the 2000s (decade), many essay mills began offering online services. The most basic ‘essay mill’ service is the sale of a previously written essay. However, since submitting a previously written essay is risky, a ‘customized’ essay-writing service is available for a higher price, often reaching $10 to $50 per page.

Universities have developed several strategies to combat this type of academic fraud. Some professors require students to submit electronic versions of their term papers, so that the text of the essay can be compared against databases of essays that are known to have been written by essay mills. Other universities allow professors to give students oral examinations on papers which a professor believes to be ‘ghostwritten’; if the student is unfamiliar with the content of an essay that they have submitted, then the student can be charged with academic fraud. However, ghost writing services in the academic field have become a strong source of income for many with an acumen for writing especially in the ‘customised’ category. Irrespective of the ethical questions, the ghostwriter is not involved in anything illegal.

In the case of a ghostwritten doctoral dissertation, the client falsely presenting the work of another as his/her own is defrauding both the institution awarding the degree and future employers for whom the Ph.D. degree is a pre-requisite for the job.

Ghost writers are also employed by established academicians and researchers, who hire unemployed, underemployed or just junior researchers to write papers and books without sharing authorship. This practice is not limited to medical researchers (see next section).

Medical

With medical ghostwriting, pharmaceutical companies pay both professional writers to produce papers and then pay other scientists or physicians to attach their names to these papers before they are published in medical or scientific journals. Medical ghostwriting has been criticized by a variety of professional organizations representing the drug industry, publishers, and medical societies, and it may violate American laws prohibiting off-label promotion by drug manufacturers as well as anti-kickback provisions within the statutes governing Medicare. Recently, it has attracted scrutiny from the lay press and from lawmakers, as well. It is permitted at some institutions, including the University of Washington School of Medicine, while it is prohibited and considered a particularly pernicious form of plagiarism at others, such as Tufts University School of Medicine.

Professional medical writers can write papers without being listed as authors of the paper and without being considered ghostwriters, provided their role is acknowledged. The European Medical Writers Association have published guidelines which aim to ensure professional medical writers carry out this role in an ethical and responsible manner. The use of properly acknowledged medical writers is accepted as legitimate by organisations such as the World Association of Medical Editors and the British Medical Journal. Moreover, professional medical writers’ expertise in presenting scientific data may be of benefit in producing better quality papers.





Self Editing For Fiction Writers.

7 12 2012

A great blog post about self editing!

writemindsauthors

Some time ago, I wrote aboutWriting to Sell” by Scott Meredith and how this book made a difference in how I write. I still think it is a great book. Last week I found another book while reading a blog by David Gaughran. David recommended a book titled “Self-Editing for Fiction Writers. As I took a look at the book I figured I might as well see what it had to offer so I purchased it. It arrived Saturday. I read the first chapter today. I wish I would have had this book five years ago. I wish I would have had BOTH of these books five years ago. (For additional insights, check out Dave King’s website here.) As I read today, I decided I would blog about each chapter as I go through the book. I am going to list only the…

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Reblog Week: The Challenges of Series Fiction

3 12 2012

For all my trilogy writers: an interesting post.





Copy Editing: The Nitty, Gritty, Checklist.

25 11 2012

Copy editing is more than just commas and semicolons. If you want to copy edit like a professional, go through the list below. Warning: this is not for the faint of heart. 🙂

Readability

  1. Sentences are clear, direct, and concise.
  2. Repetition is used effectively.
  3. Parallel structure is used effectively.

Style

  1. Heads, lists, and sentences have parallel construction.
  2. Headings follow hierarchy guidelines.
  3. Voice and tone are consistent.

Transitions

  • Text is easy to follow.
  • Information is complete and appropriately placed.
  • Transitions between parts, chapters, and sections are clear.
  • Transitions are effective on screen and on paper.
  • Cross-references are correct, worthwhile, and sufficient.

Grammar

  • Sentences are complete.
  • Subjects and verbs, and pronouns and antecedents agree.
  • Verb tense is consistent.
  • Modifiers are used appropriately.
  • Word choice and sentence structure follow guidelines for localization.
  • Long sentences are divided for readability and localization.

Punctuation, Capitalization, and Spelling

  • Punctuation follows editorial and documentation set guidelines.
  • Capitalization is consistent and follows editorial and documentation set guidelines.
  • Spelling is consistent and follows editorial and documentation set guidelines.

Mechanics

  • Typeface conventions are followed in all book elements.
  • Product names are used correctly and consistently.
  • Trademarks are used correctly.
  • New terms are defined and appear in a glossary, if there is one.
  • Abbreviations and acronyms follow editorial and localization guidelines.
  • Numbers and symbols follow editorial and localization guidelines.
  • Cross-references are punctuated correctly and refer to the intended target.
  • Numbered lists and steps are used appropriately and are numbered correctly.
  • Figures and tables are referred to in preceding text.
  • Table continuations are noted correctly.
  • Notes, Cautions, and Warnings are used correctly.
  • Jump tables are used correctly.
  • Footnotes are used correctly.
  • Running footers and page numbers are correct.

Formatting and Layout

  • Book conforms to company publications standards.
  • Standard templates and formats are used.
  • Page breaks and line breaks are effective.

Graphics

  • Graphics are consistent throughout the book.
  • Illustrations follow artwork and localization guidelines.
  • Figure callouts are capitalized correctly and are in the correct font.

Front Matter

  • Title page has correct title, part number, and revision number.
  • Credits page is current and trademarks (including third-party trademarks) are listed.
  • Table of contents includes correct heads and is formatted correctly.
  • Figures and tables are listed in the table of contents.
  • The preface uses the correct template and contains correct chapter numbers, titles, and descriptions.
  • The typographical conventions section within the preface is current.
  • Page numbers at the bottom of the pages are correct.

Back Matter

  • Appendixes are in the correct order.
  • Templates and formats are used correctly in appendixes and glossaries.
  • Bibliography is presented correctly.
  • Glossary terms are alphabetized, appropriate for audience, and defined clearly.
  • Index is complete, double-posted effectively, and formatted correctly.
  • Page numbers are correct.

Whew! If you want a professional copy editor to polish your book or article email Carolyn Elias at carolyn@charleshenryediting.com.





Promotional: Correction Line, A Book Review

21 11 2012

This Saturday, Charles Henry Editing is launching a weekly book review series! Our first book is Correction Line by Craig Terlson.

Craig Terlson’s fiction has appeared in Carve, Hobart, Smokelong Quarterly, Bound Off, 3:AM, Slow Trains Literary and many other literary journals in the United States, United Kingdom, and South Africa. Correction Line is Terlson’s first novel,  and it looks like a doozy.

Here is a brief description of Correction Line from Amazon.com:

If not for the sharp curves of prairie correction lines, grid roads would converge into one point. When encyclopedia salesman Roy Blake meets Lucy, an ex-palmist living in a secluded house, he hits a different sort of curve. After a failed sales visit, Roy returns to find the house trashed and her dog tied up in the basement. Just as he discovers a shelf of glowing mason jars, two men carrying shotguns arrive and start smashing furniture upstairs. Before the men can flush him out of the basement, a chemically induced explosion levels the house and Roy barely escapes. Lucy pulls Roy into a world of bowling hustlers, Cuba-loving assassins, strange healing liquids, and guys that take baseball way too seriously. Curve balls meet curved roads, and Roy hits a correction line that will drive him toward a man who controls an entirely different salesforce.

If you’d like to read Correction Line go to:

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B008JKYQEO

To connect with Craig Terlson go to:

If you would like to have your work reviewed please go to the ‘Other Services’ to read what to send in an email to Carolyn Elias at carolyn@charleshenryediting.com. Please note that the earliest review slot available is December 15th, 2012.








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